Training Tools | Learning to be Mindful On and Off the Trail

After finishing the UROC 100K in Virginia.

I have added a new weapon to my daily training.

This weapon is helping me in my personal relationships, at work, and has become a new tool to use when things get rough on the trail.

A year and a half ago, I discovered that my body had an interesting way of letting me know that I was feeling stressed out: My hair started falling out.

Continue reading

Training Philosophy: Variety is Key

Early miles of the Pinhoti 100 in November.

Jared posted the other day about training volume, and his three-up-one-down training philosophy.

He stressed that each runner needs to find what works for them, but then to not be afraid of letting that evolve. This got me thinking about how my training — and everything else — has changed over the last couple years.

I used to live in a building that had a fancy pants gym one floor down, so I used to do my weekday runs on a treadmill. All of them.

When the weather was too bad or the morning was too dark — or the sunshine too bright — I’d run inside.

Inside the building and inside my comfort zone.

Continue reading

Training Philosophy (aka How Not to get Injured)

This site focuses on ultrarunning, and significant amount of this site will be dedicated to running more than 100 miles. But we realize that a fair number of people are still growing their abilities and may be curious how we train. Below are some of the basics. We will post more specific training updates down the line.

Ultrarunners are used to getting a certain set of questions when sane people learn what we do for fun.

The conversation normally starts with a look a of disbelief followed by, ” … wait, how far?”

Then it progresses to the obligatory, “I don’t even like to drive that far,” to which I always reply that I don’t like to drive that far either.

Eventually, if the person is curious enough — or another runner — they ask how we train to run such long distances.

Continue reading